Scrapbooking Travel: The Road Trip

by Debbie Hodge
In Travel & Vacations, I described 5 kinds of trips/vacations. Each of these types of travel have their own “story arc” that can help you figure out what pages to include. Here I show you how to approach “The Road Trip.”

Scrapbooking the Road Trip

A “road-trip” type vacation is not necessarily a literal trip in a car on a road or highway. The “road-trip” vacation is one that takes you to a series of what may be quite different locales over the course of one trip.

The road-trip is a story that’s well-suited to being told in chronological order (more or less). An approach for creating a page plan follows.

“To Vegas & Back” is the first (or cover) page from a vacation our family took with my husband’s brother. We met up with other family along the way in a variety of locales, and the photos here give a peek at the people we spent time with.

1. Review the chronology of your trip by pulling out your stack of photos or bringing up your photo browser on the computer and make a list of the trip’s parts or stops. My list from the trip you’ll see scrapbooked throughout this class is in the box here.

2. Now revise or makes notes on the list while asking yourself the following:

  • Does everything need to be scrapbooked? (On my list, I’m leaving out our actual travel to California — the photos aren’t great and nothing remarkable happened.)
  • Are there points at which chronology doesn’t matter? (On my list, the sights we visited in Vegas really don’t need to be scrapped in strict chronological order but the pages should be grouped together.)
  • Are there repeat visits to a location that could be scrapbooked together on a page? (On my list, the two beach outings can be combined.)
  • Are there “onesies” (or twosies or threesies)–photos that don’t merit their own page but that you could group together?
  • How many pages will a stop or sight get? Single? Double? Multiple pages?

3. Fill in the Page Planner and assign pages to spots in your album, while thinking about:

  • an opening page
  • ordering the pages for a flow that makes the chronology of events understandable but that’s not absolutely locked into chronological order (You want to be able to group onesies, and make adjustments so that one-pagers facing one another make sense and tell the story of your trip efficiently).
  • an overview page of the trip that gives a sense of the itinerary or route to ground album viewers as they proceed.
  • which pages will face one another.
  • where to include memorabilia (which stops have memorabilia you really want to save and could memorabilia from several outings be combined on a page that collects onesies and provides some kind of summary or overview of a part of the trip? (“At the Rio” below is an example of this)).
  • a final page to end the series

“At the Rio” is a spread that combines onesies from the days we spent in Vegas for a two-pager that gives an overview of the hotel where we stayed. This was a great place for Vegas memorabilia, too.

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