Story Forms for Scrapbook Pages: Tell a Journey Story

The “journey” is the oldest story form known.

Journey stories are in the bible, children’s storybooks, and Greek myths.

The journey story is one in which your subject leaves home on a “journey” and returns transformed. The journey can be a true trip or a more figurative journey of the spirit. It can take place in a day, a month, a year, or even a lifetime.

Tell a journey story on your scrapbook page

Examples of real life incidents that are “journey” stories include pursuing a weight-loss program, getting through a year with an intimidating boss, or doing something new that’s out of your comfort zone. In journey stories, there are often unexpected meetings and events along the way that all contribute to the effect of the journey.

How to write a journey story for your scrapbook page

1) Begin by conveying how the journey came about.

2) Tell of the events along the way–especially of the events along the way that contribute to the change in the journeyer at the end.

3) By the end, be sure you’ve told about the impact of the journey on your subject.

How to discover your own journey stories for scrapbook pages

Holding idea of the journey story in your mind, look through your photos and see if any of them are, in actuality, journeys. Let the idea of a journey story help you shape your telling of this event. By comprehending that something was a journey, you’ll be open to understanding the ramifications of it.

The journey in “Anime” begins as a literal journey of 50 miles to a convention center. The more meaningful journey that evolves is of the act of my son seeking out others with a shared interest and gathering up the nerve and resources to meet them.

The journey described in “Been There” begins with my own greatly desired departure from a small-town farm. The journaling is written in letter form to my nieces. My pursuits are encapsulated—college, early failed marriage, successful business career,  and, then, finally a stay-at-home mom living a life closer to that I left than I ever imagined I’d have. The final paragraph describes the resulting impact: that I now appreciate the land I left in a way I never did as a child.

The next oldest story form? “A Stranger Comes to Town” — look for a post on this topic soon.

,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply