Scrapbooking Ideas for Juvenile Print Patterns

juvenilepatternsFind scrapbooking ideas for using juvenile print patterns on your layouts. These prints are bright and fun, with whimsical styling and often featuring motifs like critters or trucks that resonate with young children. how our creative team used juvenile patterned papers on scrapbook pages here.

Deborah Wagner says, “When we got home from vacation and had our photos developed, I was shocked to see I let my son get this close to a crocodile for a photo opportunity.I made this page with a “quick-page” template that had most of the embellishments and the titlework already in place. I added my papers, photo and a few embellishments to support this playful theme. I used only one patterned paper, a juvenile print with crocodiles, trees, and other animals.”

Dangerous by Deborah Wagner. Supplies: Studio DD: Layer Works No. 16; Katie Pertiet: Gator Crossing Kit, Spooktakular Kit, Photo Glows, Away We Go Kit, Photo Corners Colors No. 2, Ad Inspiration 2-23-13; Art Warehouse: Photo Captions Boys

Kiki Kougioumtzi says, “This photo shows my daughter discovering long-forgotten older toys that seemed like new to her. It was like Christmas morning!

“To support to that “Christmas-morning-opening-presents” tone, I added torn paper strips. Using the torn strips was a good way to use so many bright, cheerful patterned papers for the page background. The tearing exposes the paper’s white core and tones makes the mixing easier.” 

Everything Old Is New Again by Kiki Kougioumtzi | Supplies:Patterned paper,Chipboard shapes:K & Company;Alphas:Basic Grey,Authentique.

Celeste Smith used an adorable animal-print paper to set the scene for a  page about her family’s favorite part of attending their local fair: the treats!   

Treat by Celeste Smith | Supplies: October Afternoon: Farm Fresh Collection.

Michelle Houghton says, “Every year I make Halloween costumes for both daughters. Lori threw me a challenge this year saying she wanted to be a turtle. The shell turned out nicely, and she wore it around with her pajamas the morning I finished it.”

“I found this turtle-print paper and knew, even though I had not printed these photos yet, that I had to have it to document the fun costume.  I also found a fun fuzzy trim that matched perfectly since the turtle shell is made out of fleece.  The buttons add pops of color and dimension, and one even has a turtle-shell-like texture”

Turtle Shell by Michelle Houghton | Supplies: cardstock; Bazzill Swiss Dots, chipboard letters; American Crafts, buttons; Buttons Galore, journal tag; Jenni Bowlin, patterned paper and trim unknown.

Amy Kingsford says, “This is the story of our move into a new house.  I used Mapquest screen captures to display the movement from “point a” to “point b.”  To accent the page I used a block of juvenile patterned paper with a transportation motif. Moving into our first home was like a dream come true, and I used the cutesy paper and embellishments to convey this “dream-like” feeling on the page.”

Moving Day by Amy Kingsford | Supplies: Deena Rutter: Scenic Route Full Kit; Robyn Meierotto: Cut It Out Stitched Frames (Stitching); Mye De Leon: You Are My Sunshine Papers (Cardstock); Just Jaimee: Wood Veneer Alpha; Crystal Livesay: See the World Templates

Marie-Pierre Capistran says, “I made this page to explain to my daughter why we named her Maya.”

“I used lots of tiny prints in soft colors for a cute and baby-themed look. I embellished with fairly big and bold animals and critters that I cut from other patterned papers and with lots of buttons of different shapes, cute brads, and jewels, and lots of stitching. Everything on my page screams cute and baby.”

My name is Maya by Marie-Pierre Capistran | Supplies: Patterned Papers: My Mind’s Eye; Die cuts: My Mind’s Eye; Brads; My Mind’s Eye; Buttons: Doodlebug; Lace border: Hero Arts; Chipboard border: My Mind’s Eye; Others: baker’s Twine, Stickles.

Deborah Wagner says, “My daughter’s first job was at an ice cream stand, and I couldn’t stop myself from going through the drive-through to take a photo.”

“I used a child-like car patterned paper to support the drive-through theme. To keep it girly, I added a scalloped edge, cutesy embellishments and subtly patterned papers.”

Drive Thru Sweetness by Deborah Wagner. Supplies: Katie Pertiet Storyteller Layered Template, On the Go Kit, Worth Repeating Brushes No.6, Date Strips and Stamps No. 3, You and Me Element Pack, Made with Paper Flowers No. 1, Drop Shadow Action Set; Lynn Grieveson Raspberry Sundae Kit, Cathy Zielske Layered Template No. 12, Layered Template No. 3; Studio DD Layer Works Hearts No. 2, Layered Works Little Hearts No. 5, Layer Works No. 7; Cassie Jones Extractions with Dimension, Customer Stickers; Anna Aspnes Stitched by Anna White No. 1

Christy Strickler says, “These photos are from when my grandfather brought his new puppy over to play with my son.”

“Whimsical prints have a fun, lighthearted feel. I wanted my layout to be fun but also to show how much the subjects in the story love each other. This type of patterned paper captures that. The wood hearts and crochet flower add to to warmth.”  

A Dog Named Dixie by Christy Strickler |Supplies Patterned Paper, Flower: Bella Blvd.; Button: JBS Mercantile; Letters: Basic Grey, American Crafts; Wood Veneer: Studio Calico; Other: DMC floss

Carrie Arick  used monster-themed patterned papers and embellishments to tell a cute story about one of her son’s fears as a young child.”  

I Ain’t Afraid by Carrie Arick

Adriana Puckett  used a fun and colorful juvenile patterned paper for her background on a page about handcrafting. The bright colors work well with her photo and the pattern, itself, adds to the feeling of happiness that Adriana is trying to convey about one of her favorite hobbies. 

Handcraft by Adriana Puckett | Supplies: Paper: Bella Boulevard; Cardstock: Bazzill; Letters – “Handcraft” is American Craft Thickers; “a little bit of your heart” is cut from the Silhouette Cameo; brads: Basic Grey; crocheted flower – unknown supplier; fabric for heart – Stampin’ Up.

5 Responses to Scrapbooking Ideas for Juvenile Print Patterns

  1. Sandra Lea September 7, 2013 at 1:33 pm #

    The layouts are BEAUTIFUL! I have wanted ideas along the juvenile line…thanks:)

  2. ARC September 7, 2013 at 11:34 pm #

    I have that same paper that Celeste used in her layout! Love how great these looks – I always cringe when I find those papers in my stash as they’re not my style. I usually give them to my 3yo to cut up, but maybe now I’ll try actually using them!

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  3. Comics and Juvenile Prints | Scrapweaver - September 10, 2013

    […] I do not often scrap with juvenile prints BUT when I saw this particular paper I knew it was a must, I even knew which photos I would most likely scrap with it.  I wish I still had the manufacturer to share but I lost it along the way.  The fiber was one of MANY that my friend Brenda and I collect when we shop at CKC in Kansas City each year.  We seem to be drawn to them and they are sold by the yard at many of the vendors.  The problem is none of them are marked with manufacturers.  They are already cut and hanging or thrown into big bins, all of which are tremendous fun to dig through .  The green button was already in my monster stash, it is the only one I had and has the perfect turtle shell texture to tie the whole thing together.   The “turtle shell” was a big deal in our house and is still being worn to this day so it deserved a special page all to itself.   Check out all the other fun, pages HERE […]

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